Fighting hate crime

Mary MarshallProposed by Liberal Democrat councillor Mary Marshall, Elmbridge Borough Council passed the motion below at its meeting on 20 July 2016:

“We are proud to live in a diverse and tolerant society. Racism, xenophobia and hate crimes have no place in our country. We, Elmbridge Borough Council, condemn racism, xenophobia and hate crimes unequivocally. We will not allow hate to become acceptable.

“Elmbridge Borough Council will work to ensure local bodies and programmes have the support and resources needed to fight and prevent racism and xenophobia. We reassure all people living in Elmbridge that they are valued members of our community.”

Elmbridge has a long established history of promoting and developing a robust Equality and Diversity agenda. It was the first Borough in Surrey to set up a borough-based Equality and Diversity Forum in 2007, which comprises representatives from statutory, voluntary, community and faith sector organisations as well as individuals with an interest in equality and diversity issues in Elmbridge.

The forum remit covers all areas where inequality and discrimination may exist and includes older people, disability, gender, race, religion and belief, sexual orientation and transgender identity, as well as other broader equality issues. Its mission statement is “to promote equality, celebrate diversity and support good relations in Elmbridge”.

Will Britain survive Brexit? Join the next Liberal Exchange.

key_tom_brakeIn last June’s referendum 60% of Elmbridge voted to ‘remain’ in the EU. This contrasts starkly with the position of our local Tory MP as a hard Brexiter, which does not allow for our pro-European views to be represented democratically in Parliament.

Liberal Democrat MP Tom Brake will lead the discussion in the next Liberal Exchange about Britain’s economic and cultural challenges brought on by what threatens to become a ‘hard Brexit’. This event is open to all and will take place on Thursday 10 November 2016 at 7.30pm at Holy Trinity Church Hall, Church Road, Claygate.

Organised by Elmbridge Liberal Democrats the event offers increasingly anxious citizens an opportunity to air their concerns about the negative impact of Brexit on our country and our families’ lives going forward.

The focus will be on the many uncertainties brought about by the Tory government’s risky approach to exit-negotiations. For this reason the Liberal Democrats are pressing the unwilling Theresa May to give the nation and its representatives in Parliament the final say in settling the terms of Britain’s departure from the EU.

All are welcome!

Tribute to ex-councillor Jimmy Cartwright

Ex-councillor Jimmy Cartwright passed on Monday 25 July in East Whittering. Representing the Claygate ward he served many years as Liberal Democrat councillor in Elmbridge Borough Council until 2013, when he retired at the age of 81 and moved to West Sussex. As a tribute to Jimmy we re-publish an interview with him and his wife Audrey from the April 2013 issue of Focus.

Jimmy Cartwright resigns from Elmridge Council – by-election in May 2013

A long-serving Claygate Councillor Jimmy Cartwright has decided to ‘retire from active service’ at the mature age of 81. He has resigned from Elmbridge Borough Council and
this triggered a by-election as his term runs into 2014. The Liberal Democrats have selected Mary Marshall of Holroyd Road, Claygate as their candidate in the forthcoming May elections, hoping to hold on to the seat vacated by Jimmy.

The Focus team visited Jimmy and his wife Audrey as they prepare to re-locate to their new home in West Sussex. Copious cups of tea and delicious cakes inspired a memory-laden fire-side chat with the cheerful couple.

There was a time when Jimmy Cartwright, as the local area manager for Wall’s, used to witness his salesman pick up orders for meat pies, pasties, bacon and pork sausages from eleven (yes you heard right!) different grocery stores in Claygate. Well into the 60‘s the village was still a haven for small stores littered around the village and where people were served over the counter. “Social life and meeting your neighbours in those days revolved around getting your daily shop locally, that’s how important news were exchanged and village affairs were discussed”, Jimmy comments.

“There were no refrigerators either so the stock turnover had to be swift” says Jimmy when looking back at his long and happy career with food manufacturers, and at the different pace of life in the village. Jimmy’s patch as Wall’s area manager was Surrey, but his home base was in Claygate. And so it has remained to this day. In the intervening years Jimmy has witnessed the growth of Claygate into a ‘small town with a friendly village atmosphere’ and a total transformation of grocery retailing.

With his sales experience and the knowledge of the local commercial scene, it was no wonder that in later life Jimmy got involved in running village affairs in the Parish Council. But before retiring fully Jimmy also served a number of years as a bursar in a Molesey school. “I wasn’t ready to rest on my laurels after a busy and rewarding career in a sales role, so I decided to apply for this position in a school. It got me involved in the community from the educational side.”

One thing rapidly followed another and Jimmy was elected a Liberal Democrat Councillor in 2002, representing the Claygate ward in Elmbridge Borough Council. “It’s been very rewarding and I’ve enjoyed every minute of it. Speaking on behalf of your community is really more about being an alert and active neighbour than politics as such. After all these years you get to know the people in the village and they know you, so serving as a councillor comes naturally.”

Jimmy’s father ran a grocery business in Kingston, which had an influence on his later career choice. But it was Audrey, his future wife, who drew young Jimmy’s attentions to Claygate. Her family lived in Hare Lane and Audrey’s responsibilities in the family home included mucking out in the stables with 15 beautiful horses. “We had a riding school and I had my very own Lad, a handsome thoroughbred stallion. I think Jimmy first fell in love seeing me mount Lad and looking the part,” Audrey giggles.

The young couple move to their first home together in Meadow Road and subsequently to Rosehill, but later took up residence at Audrey’s family home in Hare Lane where they have remained ever since. “This has been our ‘happy castle‘ for many years and we’ve enjoyed being in the centre of action in the village. The horses have long since gone, but wonderful memories remain,” tells Audrey.

A while ago Jimmy and Audrey decided that in their senior years it was time to embark on ‘a project to explore the world‘. So they started looking for a new home in West Sussex, by the sea. They eventually found just the ideal one in East Whittering, near where Jimmy’s younger brother already lives. Although Jimmy still had a year left of his term as a councillor, he decided that now is the right time to move and handed in his resignation to Elmbridge Council.

“As a councillor I have always believed that the best way to get things done is to talk quietly and personally with everybody – including those who opposed my ideas or perspective on things. Grandstanding or aggression was never for me,” Jimmy analyses his approach in Council work.

Surrey By Election

Leatherhead North 2016
Since the referendum there has been an upswing in support for the pro-European Liberal Democrat Party.  Membership in Elmbridge is soaring and in Mole Valley the Liberal Democrats have one a dramatic victory with very high swing of 23%.  All other parties lost support.

Unlike Britain as a whole, Elmbridge was for Remain as was Surrey and South-East England.

Never you tell ’em a lie!

BabyThe English have not been listened to for too long and eventually they lashed out. Unfortunately, in this referendum, they threw the baby out with the bath water.  Or more exactly, they have thrown the baby out but have ended up with the bathwater still in the bath.

Understandably, many on our island feel unconnected to the decision making around them and that they have been ignored by “those in power”.  In my view, the problem lay much more with the government of Britain rather than of Europe.  Mainly, but not exclusively, because Westminster MPs often use “Europe” to blame for unpopular or unwise decisions at home.  Treat people badly for long enough and they will rise up.

It reminds me of a poem that my father read to me when I was a kid and I, in turn, read to my children.

“My son,” said the Norman Baron, “I am dying, and you will be heir
To all the broad acres in England that William gave me for share
When he conquered the Saxon at Hastings, and a nice little handful it is.
But before you go over to rule it I want you to understand this:–

“The Saxon is not like us Normans. His manners are not so polite.
But he never means anything serious till he talks about justice and right.
When he stands like an ox in the furrow – with his sullen set eyes on your own,
And grumbles, ‘This isn’t fair dealing,’ my son, leave the Saxon alone.

“You can horsewhip your Gascony archers, or torture your Picardy spears;
But don’t try that game on the Saxon; you’ll have the whole brood round your ears.
From the richest old Thane in the county to the poorest chained serf in the field,
They’ll be at you and on you like hornets, and, if you are wise, you will yield.

“But first you must master their language, their dialect, proverbs and songs.
Don’t trust any clerk to interpret when they come with the tale of their wrongs.
Let them know that you know what they’re saying; let them feel that you know what to say.
Yes, even when you want to go hunting, hear ’em out if it takes you all day.

They’ll drink every hour of the daylight and poach every hour of the dark.
It’s the sport not the rabbits they’re after (we’ve plenty of game in the park).
Don’t hang them or cut off their fingers. That’s wasteful as well as unkind,
For a hard-bitten, South-country poacher makes the best man-at-arms you can find.

“Appear with your wife and the children at their weddings and funerals and feasts.
Be polite but not friendly to Bishops; be good to all poor parish priests.
Say ‘we,’ ‘us’ and ‘ours’ when you’re talking, instead of ‘you fellows’ and ‘I.’
Don’t ride over seeds; keep your temper; and never you tell ’em a lie!”

We live in interesting times.

European Democracy

european-union-flag-1024x7681Brexiters have a constant refrain that we need our democracy back.  It is true that democracy means different things to different people but I would contend that there is a general consensus that laws must be passed by a representative body and that those representatives must be replaceable at elections.

No European law can be passed without the consent of the European parliament. The lower house of that parliament is elected directly by the people of Europe.  Indeed it is more representative of the European people than the British government is in representing the British.  Members of the upper house of Europe are appointed by their respective governments – not as democratic as it should be – but better than the British upper house of Lords which is simply appointed by our Prime Minister alongside people who got there simply by birth.  So Europe is democratic.

Of course the more astute Brexiters might well say that okay Europe is democratic but we  British are out-voted all the time by the other Europeans because there are 64m of us and 444m of them.  This is true.  However, Britain votes on the winning side 87% of the time – not 100% – but far greater than your chance of electing the government of your choice in Britain which currently is stands at 37% (or 24% depending on your point of view).  Britain has greater sway in Europe than you do in electing your British government.  In fact, over twice the sway – pretty good odds if you ask me.

Brexiters say – but we want 100% and 87% is not good enough.  Hang on – who is the we? Here in Elmbridge we recently voted for a new administration which is not Conservative. Yet we are still governed by a Conservative administration in Surrey.  Do the people of Elmbridge suddenly claim that we fear being swapped by the rest of Surrey?  Surrey has continually elected Conservative administrations for over century yet Britain has, on many occasion, been run by the Labour party.  Does Surrey aim for Sexit?  Leaving because you do not like the wider view is a possible decision.  But if we are intent to apply this idea in relation to Britain and Europe why not equally apply to England and Britain or Surrey and England or Elmbridge and Surrey?  Would we, the people of Elmbridge, leave Britain because we are often outvoted by the rest of the island? Of course not.  There is no consistency to it – the “we” argument does not cut it.

Getting rid of the Government
Except in the recent Elmbridge elections we can only vote for a third of the councillors each year.  It can take a number of years to change administrations. In some ways this is a good thing because the public mood at the time of a particular election would not overly affect the administration.  In any case there is a debate to be had.  Surrey has a general election every four years, Britain and Europe every five years.

Just as the people of Surrey can remove their government  – though choose not to – the people of Britain and the people of Europe can get rid of theirs.  In 2014 Europeans had the chance of removing the majority administration but did not do so.  In 2015 the British had a chance to change their government and chose to do so.  It’s up to the people.

In Europe the Conservative Party (74 MPs) and UKIP (46 MPs) are in opposition and the Labour party (190 MPs) and the Liberal Party (70 MPs) are in government.  Perhaps that’s why UKIP and so many British Conservative MPs want to leave.  Who knows?

Trade deals and the Single Market

With all of the talk of trade deals in and out of Europe in recent weeks I have not seen a article that clarifies the difference between a single market and a trade deal.  Comparing the two as if they were similar confuses the issue.  The difference is vast – not so much comparing apples and pears but apples and a combine harvester.

Trade Deal
A trade deal is an agreement between two countries where they lower their import and export duties and other tariff barriers to trade.  These negotiations can take many years to conclude and on occasion they can be agreed very swiftly.  They can cover one industry or a range of industries but they are rarely comprehensive.  There are gains to both parties to the trade deal but usually the bigger partner gains most as they can bargain harder.  Britain would be at a disadvantage because three quarters of the world’s trade is undertaken by countries that are bigger than Britain – and in some cases much bigger. Those deals would be worst for us than if the much larger Europe negotiated on our behalf.

Free Trade Area
This is where a number of countries reduce or (rarely) eliminate their customs and tariffs between themselves.  Their tariffs on trade with other countries is not aligned – each country trades with third parties as they like.  There are a number of these across the world some more successful than others.  Britain was once a member of EFTA – the European Free Trade Area.  The tariffs between the members were agreed but the tariffs to other countries was set by each member state.  A television imported into Britain from Japan could have a different tariff from that imported from Japan into Austria.

Customs Union
This an extension to a free trade area in that both the internal tariffs and external tariffs are aligned.  This was the basis of the of the European Common Market.  A television imported into Britain from Japan would have the same tariff as that imported from Japan into Austria.  A customs union was only considered a foundation position for Europe as it was always intended that we would have a single market eventually.  Although it was Margaret Thatcher that campaigned to push  it though.

Single Market
A single market is not only where the internal and external customs, controls and tariffs are the same across the area but also all the rules governing trade are the same.  Unlike the other arrangements, a single market provides dramatically greater benefits because the others only provide the reduction – usually only partial  – of tariff barriers.  So that exporters will still need to provide differently specified goods and services for each individual market. In the single market what can be sold at home can be sold throughout the single market without any change.  In our case, it give us access to the world’s biggest free market.

Size of Economy-01The chart shows the top ten economies in the world. They are ranked in purchasing power parity order: China, Europe, America, India, Japan, Russia, Brazil, Indonesia, Mexico and Korea.  If Britain was not part of the single market then it would be the ninth largest market in the world (one hundred years ago we were top). Still impressive being ninth but it does not matter how many trade deals we agree or how many free trade areas we join we would still be in ninth position.

When Scotland joined England in 1707 it entered the largest single market in the world – only to be overtaken by America between the wars. If Britain leaves the single market Scotland might choose to leave Britain and remain in Europe along with Northern Ireland and Wales.  England would still be the ninth largest market in the world but the rest of Britain and Ireland would be in the largest single market.

Who gets our taxes

We pay £45.50 everyday in taxes, on average, here in Elmbridge – that’s for every man, woman and child living in the borough.

We pay Elmbridge 34p a day, Surrey £2.48 a day, Britain £42.15 a day and Europe 55p a day.
Tax Pie Chart-01

Because, on average, we in Elmbridge are richer than the average person in Surrey we contribute more than other residents of Surrey – we are net contributors.

Again, because we are richer, on average, than most people living in Britain will pay more per person to Westminster than the rest of Britain – we are net contributors.  It is as if the average family in Elmbridge writes a cheque to an average family in Fermanagh for around £1,500 a year.

Finally, because, on average, we in Elmbridge are richer than than most people in Europe we pay more per person to Brussels than the rest of Europe – we are contributors.  It is as if the average family in Elmbridge writes a cheque to an average family in Estonia of £23 a year.

Via government transfers, families in Elmbridge have been paying families in Fermanagh £1,500 a year for decades and no-one raises an eyebrow.  Has anyone said “we want our money back” to the people of Northern Ireland?  We give, say, £23 a year to families in Estonia and Brexiters go ballistic.  The Estonians sang their way to independence from the Soviet Union and they are on the front line with Russia.  The Estonians are a hard work people and the speed with which Estonia is growing, with our help, out of their Soviet Union legacy is remarkable.  They’ll soon be supporting us.

The 55p a day that each of us in Elmbridge pays, on average, to Europe is a remarkably small insurance premium for our security and well-being.

Follow Lib Dem candidates on Twitter

You can now follow three Lib Dem candidates for Elmbridge on Twitter; @vmc2uk ; @marchall11_m ; and @cllrandrewdavis

Also take a look at @PaulKenLD to read the manifesto posted by PAUL KENNEDY, the Lib Dem candidate for the post of Surrey PCC (Police and Crime Commissioner)

Looking forward to hearing from you on the things that matter to you in this local election and what you want from local councillors.

Better Train Service For Elmbridge

Southern CrossrailElmbridge could have twice as many trains running up to London with this new inexpensive change to London Waterloo station.  Look at the video.

This plan was developed by the ETA, the national environmental transport campaigning organisation charity, based in Weybridge, which through its campaigning has changed many ways in which we see the world.

The latest campaign is for a quick and simple alteration to London Waterloo station which will double its capacity and dramatically improve the daily commute for millions. Watch our video and find out more about this exciting campaign.