Blackspots in Weybridge

ACCIDENTS WAITING TO HAPPEN ON OUR ROADS

Many Weybridge residents are acutely aware of the traffic dangers in their neighbourhoods and on the roads they use as they go about their lives. Five local ‘black spots’ have been brought to our attention recently: Grenside Road (behind Thames Street), the junction by the station (again), Mayfield Road, Princes Road and Pine Grove and now Minorca Road.  All for different reasons, but each an example of why we need action to make our roads safer for all users.  In all cases Surrey County Council have a role to play in bringing about improvements.  Do you know of other roads where the risk of an accident is greater than average?

To let us know – email vicki.macleod@elmbridgelibdems.org.uk

In this article, we are highlighting the problems for residents of Grenside Road.

In Grenside Road the problem has been caused by a ‘kiss and drop’ policy for pupils at St George’s Junior School. In its efforts to encourage safety on Thames Street, the school has opened a back entrance to the school.  This now means that parents drive in to Grenside Road and park on the pavements. This has not solved the safety problem, it has simply transferred it to Grenside, where it is felt acutely by the residents who are lobbying Surrey to improve safety. They have been supported in this by Portmore Park and District Residents Association and the Lib Dems.

The local Surrey councillor has referred the matter to SCC Highways, but nothing has happened yet, despite the safety issues.

Dangers include: risk of a collision when exiting garages in the morning due to poor visibility, risk to young children going in to and leaving the school who are hidden by the bonnets of parental SUVs; risk to local pedestrians – especially those in buggies or with prams –  who are prevented from using their pavements because they are blocked by parked parents dropping off their children. The parking here is so intense at school drop off and collect time that people have been known to park on the grass between pavement and gardens.

Despite efforts of local Elmbridge Councillors and strong lobbying by Lib Dem Cllr Andrew Davis to have Grenside Road included in SCC’s Strategic Review of parking in Weybridge, SCC refused to budge from their original view and Grenside was excluded from consideration.

Possible solutions

Local resident Sarah Groves has written to her SCC councillor saying; “Local residents feel that this road has been completely ignored . . .. Since the Junior School’s ‘Kiss and Drop’ system was put in place there has been an increase in the volume of traffic on Grenside – parents are now approaching the School via Grenside from Grotto Road and from Thames Street via Convent Lane and then onto Grenside, this at peak times causes chaos especially when there is nowhere to turn safely –  Grenside Road is effectively a cul-de-sac.  The whole fabric of the road and pavements has deteriorated due to the high volume of traffic with vehicles turning and reversing onto pavements – churning the surface up with their SUV’s.”

She adds: “There is no traffic management system in place i.e. parking restrictions, speed limit signs, nor in fact the triangular signs showing children crossing; and the rear entrance/exit of the school has no clear yellow zigzags, that are outside every other school where children enter and leave.”

Local Lib Dem Vicki Macleod says “We were stunned that Surrey did not include Grenside Road in the strategic review of parking: it is a prime example of where a small intervention could have a big and positive impact on safety. We will continue to suport local residents in their quest to make Grenside safe for children and residents.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Additonal recycling from 4th December

Small household electrical, small batteries and shoes, clothes, towels etc

From 4 December 2017 Elmbridge is expanding its recycling service to include collection from home of small electrical items, batteries, clothes and home textiles. These items will be collected every week from your home on your normal collection day. They will need to be bagged in separate tied plastic bags (not black bin liners) .

Residents are requested to sort items and bag them into a separate tied plastic bag (not black bin liners) for each category and place bags next to their bin before 6.30.

What Elmridge can collect

Small electrical items

  • kettles, toasters, sandwich makers and irons
  • hairdryers and straighteners
  • radios
  • digibox/freeview box, video players and dvd players
  • clocks, alarms and watches
  • games consoles and laptops

Clothes and home textiles

  • clothes (must be clean and dry)
  • pairs of shoes and slippers
  • blankets and towels
  • curtains and bed sheets
  • accessories like belts and bags

Elmbridge cannot collect these items

  • any electrical items larger than 35 x 40cm like televisions or white goods
  • car batteries
  • low energy light bulbs
  • single shoes
  • wellington boots
  • cushions, pillows or duvets
  • cuddly toys
  • rugs and carpets
  • bric-a-brac

Find out what can be recycled.

On the day of your collection

Place your bagged items on the edge of your property next to your bins. Make sure your bags are out by 6.30am.

You can report a missed collection online from 4 December 2017.

Flats and communal properties

Unfortunately, we are unable to offer this recycling service to flats and communal properties at present.

What happens to my recycling?

Clothes and home textiles are either sorted to be worn and used again in the UK or abroad, or recycled into useful products like felt, insulation or stuffing.

The components from batteries and small electrical items are extracted and reused to make other items.  For example, zinc can be used in shipbuilding and to make lampposts or railings; gold from consoles for example can be re-used to make jewellery and musical instruments can even be made from the plastic.

Vince Cable on Brexit in Elmbridge 30th November

Liberal Democrat leader Sir Vince Cable MP will be the speaker in Liberal Exchange at Claygate Village Hall, Church Street, Claygate KT10 0JP – on Thursday, 30th November at 7.30pm – and you and your friends are warmly welcome.
Sir Vince will put a strong economic and political case for remaining in the EU and argue why the final decision on whether we should remain a member in the EU on current terms or accept the ‘deal’ negotiated by Theresa May’s government, should be given to the people. He calls such a vote ‘the first referendum on facts’, because the 2016 referendum was based on falsehoods and fraudulent promises.
In December the European Union will confirm whether it is ready to move the Brexit negotiations to talks about trade. Sir Vince will explore the implications of this critical decision with the audience as well as evaluate the overall state of Britain’s negotiation approach and process.
Liberal Exchange is organised by Elmbridge Liberal Democrats and it is an open public forum for discussions about current political priorities. All are welcome and invited to put their questions to the speaker.

NWSCCG response on the future of Weybridge Health Centre

The NWSCCG have today published their report of the two meetings held in October to inform and consult with local residents on the short and longer term future of the Weybridge Health Centre.

The NHS panel

Of crucial interest to Weybridge is the CCG’s position on replacing the Walk-in Centre service on the site.  Extracts on this subject are:

Are the treatment room services going back on site just to support the GP practices and Weybridge patients, or for wider use?

It is the CCG’s intention to support the re-provision of treatment room services for the wider population and as such we have requested proposals from our Providers.

Will there be a Walk-in Centre in the new building?

Before we decide exactly which services will be in the new building, we want to engage the local community and our partners to make sure the new facility provides the right services to meet the needs of the local population.

We understand the history and passion for the Walk-in Centre, and we will need to take that into account when planning our consultation.  However, we think it’s right to take this opportunity to think carefully about what services we need and how services might be delivered differently, and better, in the future.

We very much want to design this new facility with the help of the local community and as part of our engagement, we will think carefully about the type of services delivered at the Walk-in Centre, and others, to make sure local people have the right access to urgent, on the day care.  Access to timely care outside of what is traditionally provided by GPs is certainly what we are thinking and wanting to bring back onto the site.

You will find more questions from people who attended the meetings and the NWSCCG’s responses on a dedicated page on the NWSCCG website.

Tackling the housing crisis

The housing crisis in Britain has become an emergency. For far too long Britain has built many fewer homes than we need. Unless we build enough to meet demand, year after year, we will find that housing costs rise further out of reach.

Just to catch up with what we need today, we have to build 300,000 homes a year nationally – almost double the current level. These new houses and flats must be sustainably planned to ensure that excessive pressure is not placed on existing infrastructure.

Elmbridge borough wants to meet the needs of its people in terms of housing. Yet at every turn it comes up against the elephant in the room – the British government – which undermines local government at every turn.

The Liberal Democrats would empower localities to look after the needs of their own population and their own priorities, rather than being dictated to by central government.

A Lib Dem approach in Elmbridge

What would a Liberal Democrat Elmbridge do to solve the housing crisis if the national government got off our back?

Without restrictions from central government, Elmbridge could:

Borrow funds to build social housing

Elmbridge has the ability to service the loans, especially as interest rates are still at an historically low level. We would be investing in bricks and mortar which is always considered a very safe investment.  Elmbridge can’t though, because the national government heavily restricts our ability to do this.

Get money back when social housing is sold and reinvest this in more social housing

The national government forces local authorities and housing associations to sell houses at a discount of up to £80,000 under its ‘right to buy’ social housing programme, without any compensation to us, the owners. And then, prevents councils from using the revenue they do receive from the sales to build more social housing.

Improve the experience of renting

Elmbridge could ban letting fees for tenants, cap up-front deposits at a reasonable level, and increase minimum standards of repair and services in rented homes. We would Introduce longer tenancies, with an inflation-linked annual rent increase built in, to give tenants more security. Elmbridge cannot do this now because councils are prevented from doing this by the national government.  Our national government makes it impossible for Elmbridge to implement all the improvements we could offer to people renting in the borough.

Stop developers reneging on development payments to local councils

When Elmbridge gives permission for a developer to build a block of flats or a new street, this is on  condition that a certain proportion of the build is affordable housing. Alternatively, the developer may offer to pay a sum of money instead. The national government has made a law that allows developers to renege on paying this money once the development is built. This makes a complete mockery of the planning system.

Scrap stamp duty

The national government policy on stamp duty – a punishing 5% on homes over £250,000 across Britain – deters people from moving when they need more space. Instead of  buying a larger property and releasing a smaller one to the market, residents add extensions and loft conversions – making smaller houses bigger and reducing the number of smaller homes for first-time buyers and couples starting a family.

Our view

The national government and the media often blame NIMBYs and local planning for the lack of housing in our country. This is far from the truth. It is primarily the national government’s taxation and spending policy that stops local governments like Elmbridge planning for building the homes needed for healthy communities.

Grants for business

Elmbridge borough has grants to aid businesses  via the Elmbridge Civic Improvement Fund.  Weybridge is the biggest claimer for funds in Elmbridge.  The aim is to support the growth of the local economy.  Funding can help you business with:

  • Shop fronts and signage
  • marketing and promotion
  • town centre events
  • streetscape improvements
  • learning, skills and training

Contact 01932 474 216, email business@elmbridge.gov.uk or click here.

Changes in Recyling Regulations

Recycling centres are currently free to Surrey residents using a car, for household and for non-household waste. The centre recycle over 30 different types of household waste materials.

However from 4 December there will be no free daily allowance for householders of chargeable non-household waste such as rubble, plasterboard and soil.

According to the SCC information, the following charges will apply for:

  1. Tyres from cars, motorcycles and all other motorised vehicles (including non-motorised vehicles and trailers pulled by a motorised vehicle): £5 per tyre or part tyre.
  2. Waste from construction, alteration or repair of your home and garden including:
    • Breeze blocks, bricks, rubble, soil, stones, ceramic bathroom fittings, tiles: £4 per bag or part bag of this waste (Bags no bigger than 50cm x 77cm)
    • Concrete fence post, ceramic bath, cistern, paving slab: £4 per item
    • Plasterboard: £4 per bag or part bag or per sheet of this waste (Bags no bigger than 50cm x 77cm and sheets no bigger than 120cm x 240cm). From 4 December 2017 the cost per sheet of plasterboard will increase to £12.

If these materials are loose, a charge of £50 will apply per car load.

Additionally, if you are bringing household waste in either a van, pick-up or trailer you will need to obtain a van permit before your visit.

From 8 January if you need to dispose of non-household waste (such as from DIY projects) in a van, it can only be accepted at the larger recycling centres – this includes the one at Shepperton.

Full information can be found on the SCC site