NWSCCG response on the future of Weybridge Health Centre

The NWSCCG have today published their report of the two meetings held in October to inform and consult with local residents on the short and longer term future of the Weybridge Health Centre.

The NHS panel

Of crucial interest to Weybridge is the CCG’s position on replacing the Walk-in Centre service on the site.  Extracts on this subject are:

Are the treatment room services going back on site just to support the GP practices and Weybridge patients, or for wider use?

It is the CCG’s intention to support the re-provision of treatment room services for the wider population and as such we have requested proposals from our Providers.

Will there be a Walk-in Centre in the new building?

Before we decide exactly which services will be in the new building, we want to engage the local community and our partners to make sure the new facility provides the right services to meet the needs of the local population.

We understand the history and passion for the Walk-in Centre, and we will need to take that into account when planning our consultation.  However, we think it’s right to take this opportunity to think carefully about what services we need and how services might be delivered differently, and better, in the future.

We very much want to design this new facility with the help of the local community and as part of our engagement, we will think carefully about the type of services delivered at the Walk-in Centre, and others, to make sure local people have the right access to urgent, on the day care.  Access to timely care outside of what is traditionally provided by GPs is certainly what we are thinking and wanting to bring back onto the site.

You will find more questions from people who attended the meetings and the NWSCCG’s responses on a dedicated page on the NWSCCG website.

Heathrow third runway – your say

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In  October 2016 the national government announced that the Heathrow Northwest Runway Scheme was its preferred location for new runway capacity in the south east,  and ran a 16 week consultation.

A consultation on the revised draft Airports National Policy Statement is now underway. This is an opportunity to record your views on the proposals.

The revised draft Airports National Policy Statement sets out:

  • the need for additional airport capacity in the south-east of England
  • why government believes that need is best met by a north-west runway at Heathrow Airport
  • the specific requirements that an applicant for a new north-west runway will need to meet to gain development consent.

The consultation runs until 19th December 2017. For more information click here or phone 0300 123 4797 or go to this page to make a response.

Funding available for local community projects

This is a great opportunity for our local charities and voluntary groups which are now invited to apply for the Elmbridge borough’s annual grants fund.  Awards up to £4,000 to groups supporting people in need in the local community are available. Previous years’ initiatives have included carer respite programmes, family advocacy support, crime prevention schemes, and purchasing of equipment.

Liberal Democrat Councillor, Andrew Davis commented: “This is a great opportunity for voluntary organisations in and around Weybridge to support initiatives that directly benefit the vulnerable people in our community”.  This is your chance to apply.

A Voluntary Sector Forum will take place at 2.30 – 5.30pm, on Friday, 24 November at the Civic Centre in Esher, when advice will be given on how to apply for a grant.

For more information, or to request an application form, contact the borough’s voluntary sector support office on 01372 474543 or scampbell@elmbridge.gov.uk.  Forms can be downloaded here.

Time to Speak Out against Domestic Abuse

A free workshop is open to you in Esher at 12-2pm, on Tuesday, 28 November.
STOP ABUSE

A relationship is considered abusive when one partner tries to dominate, threaten or bully the other, either mentally or physically.

Young people and children suffer hugely when they witness such behaviour and this is also considered to be a form of domestic abuse.

The stress endured by people in abusive relationships can deeply affect their self-esteem and their health, often resulting in absence from work, or even the loss of their job as a result.

Sadly, domestic abuse is still considered by many to be a taboo subject, which means that those who suffer it are too ashamed or embarrassed to seek help. With this in mind, the Elmbridge Community and Safety Partnership and Surrey Police are keen to encourage victims to speak out and to take advantage of the services available to them.

To raise awareness locally, a free event is taking place at 12-2pm, on Tuesday, 28 November at the Civic Centre in Esher. There will be a short dramatised production by Alter Ego, exploring the impact of domestic abuse, as well as informative talks and material. To register for the event: Surrey Domestic Abuse Helpline: 01483 776822

Late Night Licence Application – Weybridge

The premises,  previously Sullivan’s Wine Bar, is proposed as a restaurant/entertainment place selling alcohol.  It would be open past 11pm

There is a notice in the window asking for local objectors to write to:
Borough of Elmbridge
Civic Centre
1 High Street
ESHER
KT10 9SD

(email or phone is not sufficient – they will only take notice of written objections)

What next for Weybridge Hospital site and services

In July 2017 fire destroyed the two GP practices, the walk-in centre and many other health facilities, offices and a pharmacy in Weybridge town centre. At a meeting late in July – attended by more residents than the hosts expected – the gathering was informed that, when the site was redeveloped, there would be, could be, no promise of restoring all the services which were lost in the fire.

Currently, residents of Weybridge believe that the two GP practices on the site will be restored but we do not know what else will happen with the town centre site.

We want to do our utmost to ensure that the residents of Weybridge are properly engaged in decision making about the future of health and care provision on the Weybridge Hospital site.

Help us help you by completing the survey

Surrey Heartlands – the next five years of Health and Social Care in Elmbridge

What’s happening to health and social care in our area?

Quite a lot actually!

The NHS has launched a programme to improve joined up working across health and social care services and is seeking to improve community provision for vulnerable groups – especially the frail elederly.

The mechanism for achieving this is locally based Sustainability and Transformation Partnerships (STPs).

Citizens of Elmbridge come under the Surrey Heartlands STP, which includes Surrey County Council, the two CCGs covering Elmbridge, and other healthcare providers.

As Surrey Heartlands has a much larger than average older population, there is a focus in the plan on improving serrvices for this group. Just to paint the picture, over the next 10 years the number of people aged 85+ will go up by 36% and by 2025 more than 20% of the population in our area will be aged 65+.

Public Engagement is also a key feature of the partnership working that is central to the new approach. This is seen as a way to involve citizens in “defining the priorities and trade-offs that will be needed to achieve this service transformation, within the resources available locally.”

A further feature of the plan is to trial devolution of powers and budget to Surrey Heartlands (see p10 in the plan). This is designed to enable “full integration with Surrey County Council, integrating health and care delivery with the wider determinants of health in our population”

If anyone is interested in getting involved as a community stakeholder, there is a stakeholder reference group meeting on 18 October at Leatherhead Leisure Centre, Guildford Road, Leatherhead starting at 2 pm. There is also a Surrey Heartlands Newsletter.

The contact person for both of these is: glynis.mcdonald@nhs.net

The Surrey Heartlands Sustainability and Transormation Plan can be found at http://www.nwsurreyccg.nhs.uk/surreyheartlands/Documents/Surrey%20Heartlands%20STP%20October%202016.pdf

The Devolution Agreement document can be found at
http://www.nwsurreyccg.nhs.uk/surreyheartlands/PublishingImages/Pages/News/Devolution%20Agreement.pdf

Tennis Courts Refurbishment

 

Concern has been raised regarding the newly introduced system for booking and charging for use of the borough’s tennis courts. See here for the full report.

However, we had reached a point where the borough needed to make a decision about how to secure the long-term future of park tennis courts and how to encourage more and different people to take exercise through playing tennis.

For over fifteen years, the courts have been allowed to deteriorate. The estimated cost of bringing the 12 most popular courts up to standard is £134,000 with a yearly refurbishment cost of £1,200 per court.  The cost of bringing all the courts up to standard, would be significantly greater and the yearly refurbishment cost would be £34,800.

The borough’s choice was:

  • do nothing and allow the courts to deteriorate even more
  • pay all upgrading costs from council tax and maintain free access to the courts at all times (and take away funds from other much needed projects)
  • raise the level of council tax for all residents
  • charge for use – with concessions for those in receipt of means-tested benefit

The borough charges for all sports: for example, badminton, swimming, football and squash. It would be difficult to single out tennis as the only sport that was free.

Different charging regimes will produce different effects, so the borough has to be clear about what it wants to achieve and charge accordingly.  The choices include:

  • maximize usage from whatever source;
  • steer particular types of user (old or young, frequent or casual);
  • maximize borough revenue; or
  • or any of the above in combination.

Your councillors unanimously, drawing on public health evidence, have chosen a charging and booking package which has worked successfully in other boroughs and which is designed to widen the range of people using the public tennis courts. This includes both annual membership at £36 a year for a family of five for frequent users and a pay as you go system for casual users. We do not yet have differentiation in charge levels to reflect the variability of demand at different times of the day, or the week, or of the year. With the current system it could be possible to have very low charges at off peak times. This would be part of any review undertaken following the experience in use.

Apart from revenue, one of the advantages of the new system is that people may book a court in advance and therefore know they have a court for when they arrive. They will also know, one assumes, that anyone already using the court has overstayed their booking.  The changeover would be rather similar to what occurs currently at the Xcel centre for those playing squash or badminton

If you want to read the report that was drafted by the borough staff for consideration by the cabinet and that was recommended by the cabinet for the approval by the full council – it is here.  If you want to read the full consultation report taking views from 196 respondents to the council’s on-line survey – it is here.

If you want to see the webcast of the short debate around the introduction of tennis court charges it is here – from 48 minutes.  You will see that there were no objections to the proposals.

Previous blog on tennis courts.

Mole Valley Conservation

Over the years the Lower Mole Partnership (LMP) has built up a large and enthusiastic volunteer group which has carried out a wide range of tasks to implement improvements to the local countryside, four days a week, including weekends, throughout the year.

LMP has also developed a broad spread of skills for tackling specialist countryside management work including landscape enhancements, woodland management and pond restoration as well as access initiatives such as the Thames Down Link footpath.

In 2011/12, as part of the then Conservative administration budget savings exercise, the borough’s grant to the LMP was reduced by £15,000.  The Liberal Democrat/Residents administration has decided to increase the borough’s grant to LMP by £6,280.  This action not only supports the active engagement of many people into nature conservancy but save the borough in task that it would otherwise have to take on itself.