Investing in Weybridge

Most of the funding for the new market / fair street improvement is being funded by CIL

New building development in Weybridge has meant that we have around £500,000 to invest in projects that improve our lives in Weybidge.

If your organisation has a project that will contribute to Weybridge’s infrastructure then apply for a grant from Elmbridge borough. You can apply for grants up to £500,000 from 13 February.

Click here for a summary on CIL and get examples of recent bids here.

Complete and submit your application by midnight on Sunday
29 March 2020.

Click here for further detailed information about the CIL grant process and do contact the borough CIL team on 01372 474342 or email cil@elmbridge.gov.uk or ourselves if you need help and guildance.

20s Plenty for Us

Why reduce speeds in our residential streets?
There are a whole host of reasons but in climate emergency terms it is to enable people to travel in the safest, healthiest and greenest way that we know and that is by cycling. We know that people will cycle if they feel safe.  The way to do this is to provide cycle ways separate from the carriageway – as opposed to a narrow lane in the kerb; and, on our side streets to have speed limits set below 20mph.

Just imagine the difference if all our secondary children could walk or cycle to their local school.  Of course, we would be reducing air pollution too.

Why is 20mph so important for safety?

Studies show that humans react differently when they are moving below 20mph as opposed to when they are moving above that speed.  It is all to do with our own maximum sprinting speed.  For obvious reasons, evolution did not equip us to react to situations when we were travelling faster than we could sprint.  So when travelling below 20mph we can deal with other drivers, pedestrians and cyclists in a far more convivial manner than when we are travelling above that speed.  

We have 30mph now – is that not good enough?

When the urban speed limit was set at 30mph in 1934 it was a matter of judgement that is was a safer speed.  Via a great deal of research, we now know that at above roughly 22mph most people find it difficult to read the intention of the person coming towards us.  The lower our speed, the more likely it would be that we could avoid bumping or crashing into someone. 

But we know driving slower is safer – what is so special about 20mph?
,,
Unlike braking distance, which increases with speed gradually, the ability to read the intention of a person coming toward you declines slowly up to around 20mph and then collapses rapidly.  Below that speed, you can see where the other person is looking and act accordingly.  Above that speed, you have to guess – and guess very quickly – to avoid a crash or, more seriously, injury or death.

The police cannot enforce a 20mph speed limit – so what is the point?

It is regrettable that our police service is decidedly overstretched but just because our police cannot, at the moment, enforce the speed this does not mean a 20mph limit should not be introduced.  Otherwise we might as well abolish the crime of theft.

Brooklands Business Park Accessibility Project

Your local councillors recently attended an update briefing from Surrey CC’s Transport Strategy Project Manager and Transport Planner on the work planned to provide improved pedestrian and cycling paths from Weybridge town centre to the station and through to Brooklands Park. 

Some preparatory work has already been completed:

  • Last summer clearing of ground-covering scrub and trees was undertaken along Heath Road; a few trees were retained to give a better aesthetic and the paths will be routed around these. 
  • The much-needed resurfacing of St George’s Avenue last October was also part of the scheme and a dropped kerb was built towards the station end of the road so that cyclists can come off the road onto a short section of pavement to then cross the main road via the refuge.
  • In November, the refuges for pedestrian access to the station were widened and dropped kerbs improved.

More work is planned for the February half-term, including larger refuges for the crossing on Brooklands Road to Heath Road South car park. Following this, the track from the car park, past the sewage treatment works, across the River Wey and through to Brooklands will be widened and provided with lighting. Funding has been ear-marked for improvements to Sopwith Drive and Wellington Way as well as for better pedestrian access to the station and for increased cycle parking provision. There will be bus stop improvements and suitably placed finger-post signs. The path under Wellington Way occasionally floods, as it has done recently, and a raised boardwalk is planned to keep this path open and usable more often.

If there is sufficient money then a second phase will be considered to link the planned route from Heath Road through to Churchfields and the town centre. This exciting proposition would complement the current discussions of a town regeneration scheme centred around developing the publicly-owned NHS, library and community centre sites. There would be further public consultation on any proposed options.

Weybridge Streetscape

Although our eventual aim is to remove all through traffic from our High Street – that will have to wait until Surrey Council Council corrects its financial position. In the meantime, we in Weybridge can undertake our own improvements using our own CIL funds.

Clearing the clutter

The first major improvement is to provide an outdoor space for markets and performances that aims to help enhance community life and bring more footfall into town. It would be difficult not to miss the work being undertaken along the pavement from the Elmgrove Road junction along the High Street past Waitrose to The Ship Hotel. The borough council has worked over the past two years to develop this scheme envisioned by the Weybridge Town Business Group.

Funded with CIL money, the redesign and resurfacing of the high street pedestrian area will create a flexible shared space that retains on-street parking for most of time and can be easily converted to provide facilities for market stalls and events. The work started on the 13th January and completion is scheduled for the 3rd April.

Key features:    

  • Declutter and open up the high street 
  • Resurface and extend the pavement  
  • Retain on-street parking 
  • Offer a flexible events space 
  • Respect the conservation areas 
  • Retain the same number of trees but replace with semi-mature trees: the current tree roots are pushing up the pavements resulting in uneven surfaces and causing accessibility issues for pedestrians. The proposed works will seek to retain the overall current number of trees but replace existing trees with new semi- mature trees within appropriate tree pits.

Hersham Hall – a Lost Opportunity

Hersham Hall has now been closed for several years following an independent condition survey which judged it to be dangerous due to a number of building related issues needing attention. It was also during this period deemed unfit for purpose as a sports hall and was underused.

£650,000 of taxpayers’ money spent on short term attempt

At full Council on Wednesday 2nd October, 31 councillors from the Residents Association, Conservative and Brexit parties on Elmbridge Borough Council voted to spend at least £650,000 of tax payers’ money in an attempt to extend the life of Hersham Hall by just five years!

Counter to the Council’s Climate Emergency Declaration

This controversial and expensive refurbishment decision was taken in the face of solid opposition from all 10 Liberal Democrat councillors and a small number of Residents Association councillors, who argued that the proposal to refurbish the ‘G’ rated EPC (energy performance certificate) Hersham Hall ran counter to the Council’s vote to declare a Climate Emergency.

The decision by the Council to declare a Climate Emergency had been taken at the previous Council meeting on 17th July 2019, witnessed by a full balcony of extremely supportive Elmbridge residents. That decision was welcomed by residents and businesses across the borough and puts Elmbridge at the forefront of progressive local government.

Additional running costs take it to £1m

Knowing that a proposal to rebuild Hersham Hall, which could have been combined with much needed affordable housing had already been dismissed by the local ward councillors and The Hersham Hall member reference group, your Lib Dem councillors proposed that the decision to spend such a large amount of money on what would be a short term fix with at best a ‘D’ rated EPC should be deferred. They further argued that the additional costs of running the hall would take expenditure in the short term to over £1 million.

Lib Dems suggest a 21st century community hub

The reasons for deferral was to give further consideration to the costs and benefits of refurbishment vs rebuilding. The LibDem councillors wanted a more thorough gathering of evidence for the potential to provide Hersham with a 21st century multi-purpose community hub fit for the future. This would give Elmbridge not only a hall to be proud of but also much needed affordable housing in a central village location. This viable proposal would also have brought in revenue to cover the cost of the rebuild, furthermore it would protect the risk of having to build on our precious Green Belt.  This  Liberal Democrat suggestion was outvoted.

Climate Emergency changes everything

The arguments given in favour of the £650,000 refurbishment were that the village had been deprived of its hall for several years, there had already been numerous different decisions made on the future of the hall, and the residents of Hersham had asked for and been promised a refurbishment by their local Councillors.

The Climate Emergency decision presents the Council with the opportunity of proving its commitment to taking real steps towards reducing the borough’s carbon footprint and increasing its affordable housing for key workers.

This is a missed opportunity

Regrettably the first chance for the Council to progress with this policy has now been missed and most unfortunately the LibDem group’s principled debate in favour of this as well as giving the community a state of the art building to be proud of was defeated in support of short-term political aims.

Elmbridge Liberal Democrat Group October 2019

Dorchester Road

The Surrey proposal for Dorchester Road is as follows:

The households which now will have access to Area F is here in purple.  The light blue area is currently Area F:

If you want details of other proposals see here.

If you want to have a look at the current restrictions look here.

If you want to offer your comments then do so here before 5 July 2019

If you want further information by all means contact weybridge@elmbridgelibdems.org.uk.

 

Weybridge On-Street Parking Review

In general Surrey proposed:

The Weybridge CPZ and the Permit Area F will have their hours extended in the evening from 6pm to 7pm to match the new off-street parking chargeable hours but it is not proposed to introduce the change from 9am to 8am to match the new off-street parking chargeable hours.

Anderson Road, Cross Road, Vale Court
Allow residents of properties known as ‘Flat 2, The Hall, Vale Road’, and ‘Allendale, Vale Road’ to be eligible to apply for permits within the existing permit parking area covering these roads.

Baker Street
Evening hours moved from 6pm to 7pm as part of the Weybridge CPZ (confirmation required)

Beales Lane
Introduce section of DYL ‘No Waiting At Any Time’ on the south side of Beales Lane, near the junction with Thames Street, to prevent parking which causes obstruction to the carriageway and/or footway.  See also Thames Street.

Broomfield Court
Introduce a permit parking area (PPA) operating ‘Monday-Friday 10am-11am permit holders N only’, covering Broomfield Court.  This is in order to provide greater opportunity for local residents to park near their homes, where currently they face competition from non-residents, such as commuters for Weybridge rail station. Key permit eligibility details (full details are listed in the draft TRO):
* Residents eligible to apply for all permit types are those occupying any residential address in Broomfield Court.
* The cost for a resident permit is £50pa for the first permit, and £75pa for any subsequent permits issued.
* The maximum number of resident permits issuable per place of abode is calculated by the number of vehicles registered to the property minus the number of off street spaces at the property.
* The maximum number of resident visitor permits issuable per place of abode per year is 120, at a cost of £2 per permit. Each permit lasts all day and is specific to the registration number of a visitor’s vehicle.
* Permit types available within this scheme are residents, visitors, carers and operational. There are no business permits. It is also proposed to introduce some sections of DYL ‘No waiting at any time’ in order to keep junctions and accesses clear and improve safety and access.

Church Street
Evening hours moved from 6pm to 7pm as part of the Weybridge CPZ (confirmation required)

Cross Road
Introduce DYLs ‘No Waiting At Any Time’ opposite the access to numbers 8 and 10 Cross Road, as vehicle parked here make it impossible for residents to gain access egress to their properties.   See also Anderson Road.

Devonshire Road
Make existing advisory disabled parking bay into a mandatory bay ‘At any time Blue Badge holders only, No time limit’. To improve compliance with existing bay

Dorchester Road, Elmgrove Road, Gascoigne Road
Introduce a range of permit holders only parking bays (Monday-Saturday 9am-7pm permit holders F only), and shared use parking bays (Monday-Saturday 9am-7pm permit holders F or two hours no return within 2 hours) in these roads. This is in order to provide greater opportunity for local residents to park near their homes, where currently they face competition from non-residents.  A number of ‘shared use’ parking bays are suggested in order to allow some free time-limited parking for visitors to local residents and the local area. The scheme has been designed to operate with high occupancy levels and therefore minimise the potential for displacement parking. It is anticipated that the scheme will simply re-arrange parking rather than increase or decrease capacity. The permit scheme will operate with the same conditions as the existing ‘area F’ parking bays. Key permit eligibility details (full details are listed in the draft TRO):
* Additional residents eligible to apply for all permit types are those occupying any residential address on Gascoigne Road, Dorchester Road, 1-21 Monument Green, 42-70 (even numbers only) High Street, 1-19 (odd numbers only) Thames Street.
* The cost for a resident permit is £50pa for the first permit, and £75pa for any subsequent permits issued.
* The maximum number of resident permits issuable per place of abode is calculated by the number of vehicles registered to the property minus the number of off street spaces at the property.
* The maximum number of resident visitor permits issuable per place of abode per year is 120, at a cost of £2 per permit. Each permit lasts all day and is specific to the registration number of a visitor’s vehicle.
* Permit types available within this scheme are residents, visitors, carers and operational. There are no business permits. It is also proposed to introduce some sections of DYL ‘No waiting at any time’ in order to keep junctions and accesses clear and improve safety and sightlines (also includes St Albans Avenue and Mount Pleasant).

Elmgrove Road, Holstein Avenue, Oakdale Road
Extend the hours of operation of the permit holders only parking bays (Monday-Saturday 9am-6pm permit holders F only), and shared use parking bays (Monday-Saturday 9am-6pm permit holders F or two hours no return within 2 hours) in these roads so that they finish at 7pm instead of 6pm. This is proposed in order to offer additional protection to residents’ parking space and is designed to tie in with the borough council’s off street car parks’ chargeable hours. Note – there is no drawing provided for this as the extents of restrictions are unchanged from the current layout.  (See also Dorchester Road).

Fortescue Road
Introduce DYLs ‘No Waiting At Any Time’ at the junction. To prevent parking which obstructs sightlines. To improve sightlines and safety at the junction.

Gascoigne Road
See Dorchester Road

Goodacre Close
Introduce DYLs ‘No Waiting At Any Time’ at the access. To prevent parking which obstructs sightlines. To improve sightlines and safety at the access.

Grenside Road
Introduce and extend existing DYLs ‘No Waiting At Any Time’ at the junction. To prevent parking which obstructs sightlines. To improve sightlines and safety at the junction.

Grotto Road
See Grenside Road

Grove Place
Extend the DYLs ‘No Waiting At Any Time’ at the junction with York Road. To prevent parking which obstructs the footway at this point.

High Street
Modify existing loading bay on the High Street to allow all vehicles to load/unload here, not just goods vehicles as at present.

Hillcrest
Evening hours moved from 6pm to 7pm as part of the Weybridge CPZ (confirmation required)

Holstein Avenue
See Elmgrove Road

Limes Road and Minorca Road
Extend the hours of operation of the permit holders only parking bays (Monday-Saturday 9am-6pm permit holders Weybridge CPZ only), and shared use parking bays (Monday Saturday 9am-6pm permit holders Weybridge CPZ or 1 hour no return within 2 hours) in these roads so that they finish at 7pm instead of 6pm. This is proposed in order to offer additional protection to residents’ parking space and is designed to tie in with the borough council’s off street car parks’ chargeable hours. Note – there is no drawing provided for this as the extents of restrictions are unchanged from the current layout.

Manor Court
Introduce DYLs ‘No Waiting At Any Time’ around the inside of the ‘island’ (access to the flats). To prohibit parking which prevents access to the flats. To improve safety.

Mayfield Road
see Fortescue Road

Minorca Road
See Limes Road

Monument Green
See Dorchester Road

Monument Hill
Evening hours moved from 6pm to 7pm as part of the Weybridge CPZ (confirmation required)

Mount Pleasant
see Dorchester Road

Oakdale Road
See Elmgrove Road

Oatlands Chase
Introduce section of SYL ‘No Waiting Mon-Fri 10am-2pm’ near the new access to the school, in order to provide somewhere for people to ‘pick-up and drop-off’ near the school. Introduce section of DYL ‘No Waiting At Any Time’ outside Yew Place to Larchfield Place, to prevent parking which obstructs sightlines. To improve safety.

Springfield Lane and Springfield Meadows
Evening hours moved from 6pm to 7pm as part of the Weybridge CPZ (confirmation required)

St Albans Avenue
See Dorchester Road

St George’s Avenue
See Goodacre Close

Thames Street
Introduce section of DYL ‘No Waiting At Any Time’ in between existing restrictions outside number 45 to 3 Portmore Pillars, to prevent parking on this part of Thames Street which causes obstruction to traffic on the carriageway and poses a safety hazard to anyone wishing to use the footway at this location. Introduce ‘No Stopping Mon-Fri 8am-5pm School Keep Clear’ on the opposite side of the road, starting from the end of the existing school keep clear to the buildout opposite the access to Portmore Park Road. Amend the hours of operation of the two existing ‘School Keep Clear’ markings to the north from ‘Mon-Fri 8:15-9:15am and 2:30-4pm’ to ‘Mon-Fri 8am-5pm’. To improve traffic flow and safety during school ‘pick up and drop off times’.  See also Beales Lane and Dorchester Road

Vale Court
See Anderson Road

Weybridge CPZ
The hours in the evening are being extended from 6pm to 7pm to align with the new off-street chargeable hours – this should affect: Baker Street, Church Street, Hillcrest, Limes Road, Manor Court, Minorca Road, Monument Green, Monument Hill, Springfield Lane, Springfield Meadows.

If you want greater details and maps see here.

If you want to have a look at the current restrictions look here.

If you want to offer your comments then do so herebefore 5 July 2019

If you want further information by all means contact weybridge@elmbridgelibdems.org.uk.

This is the Liberal Democrat Manifesto for Elmbridge

Safer, Greener, Smarter

Environment
Climate Change is an existential threat to humankind.  We will put Elmbridge on a path to become carbon neutral and will adopt appropriate policies to this end. We will work with local businesses and residents to identify and implement smart and practical measures to achieve our goal. This work will bring tangible benefits to our neighbourhoods and to our personal well-being, too.

Traffic
We will begin to tackle traffic congestion and cut air pollution by installing 20mph in residential areas, improving public transport, discouraging engine idling near schools and elsewhere, and promoting walking and cycling options across Elmbridge.  We will install electric vehicle-charging points in our car parks, encourage them in any new developments and provide free parking for zero-emission cars. We will co-ordinate on and off-street parking, introduce smart parking charging and secure easy access to services.

Planning
We will defend the Green Belt and implement a “brownfield sites first” approach in the upcoming local plan.  We will campaign for infrastructure improvements to be in place for new developments. We will set targets for social housing and family starter homes to meet the needs of a younger generation.  We will encourage local forums to create neighbourhood plans. We will also promote the concentration of shops and services in town centres.

Crime
We will strengthen Neighbourhood Watch and anti-social behaviour teams, and work with Surrey Police to restore neighbourhood policing.  We will promote leisure, sport and social facilities for young people in all towns.

Democracy
We will ensure full transparency in both borough and county budget planning and spending, as well as in the conduct of planning applications – with full accountability to residents.  We support the introduction of an effective unitary authority by merging the county and borough levels into one authority in place of the current Surrey County Council and Surrey’s eleven boroughs.

Leisure                                                                                                                               We recognise the importance of leisure to both mental and physical wellbeing and also its economic benefits.  All leisure activities should be provided at affordable cost to participants, including free adult fitness equipment in every settlement. We will safeguard libraries and look to innovate their services.

Merry Christmas Weybridge

This Saturday afternoon, Weybridge annual Christmas market and the lighting of the Christmas tree, organised by the Weybridge Town Business Group.

Market – 1pm to 6pm
The artisan, food and craft market will be held in Baker Street.  Many popular stallholders from previous market events are returning with their unique Christmas food & gift Ideas.  There are new stalls and entertainment.

Visit Father Christmas – 1pm to 6pm
Grotto and Sleigh

Carols 1:15pm
with Oatlands School ChoirCarols 3pm
with St James’s Church Choir

Children’s Parade – 4pm
Children from all five primary schools in Weybridge will take part in the lantern parade –  Manby Lodge, Oatlands, St Charles Borromeo, St James, and St Georges Junior.

Lighting Up – 4:45pm
This year the Christmas tree lights will be switched on by Miss Surrey
Carols – 5pm
For everyone to join in – carols around the tree

Brooklands Radio will be providing great music & entertainment.

Stalls
April’s Table, BBQ by Stoneleigh’s, Bee Product Gifts – Weybridge Beekeeping Society, Born to Build, Brooklands College, Brooklands Radio, Cook Weybridge, Cellar One Weybridge, Darcey B’s – Candles & More!, Father Christmas & Sleigh – Rotary Club Woking, Flipping Amazing, Forever Living, Geminera, George Bakes, Grape Outdoors, Hook A Duck Stall, In Love With Macarons, Lesley Blackburn, Love Print Unique, Mark Horner, St James’s Church, Weybridge – Dementia Care, Silent Pool Gin, Simon’s Pies, Stella and Dot, Stoked Pizza, Thru the Eye of a Needle, Tombola by Weybridge Day Centre, Village Maid Cheese, Waffles On A Stick, Willow Bakery, Wendy Foreman

Parking Reporting Back

As mentioned in a previous post, this year Surrey has sought requests for on-street parking changes for the people of Weybridge.  A number of the requests were accepted for implementation – although more were rejected.

Dorchester, Gascoigne, Limes and Minorca
There were a few requests for residents’ permit schemes.  All bar Bloomfield Court were rejected.  Despite the petitions and emails to Surrey Highways about changes needed to parking in Dorchester, Gascoigne, Limes and Minorca Roads the Highways officers’ recommendation to Surrey’s Elmbridge Local Committee was not to make any changes in these streets at this time.

Before Monday’s local committee meeting Cllr Andrew Davis discussed the matter with various members of the committee including Cllr Tim Oliver, Weybridge’s Surrey county representative and County Cllr John O’Reilly, the chair of the local committee.

The two main reasons the highways officers put forward for taking no action now were: there was a comprehensive programme to deal with the parking problems of Weybridge holistically and the petitioned schemes were too large at this stage; and, they could cause displacement.

The counter argument put by Cllr Davis was that taking a holistic approach does not mean that all action has to wait until some comprehensive development occurs.  This wait could be three to five years or longer. And, since all parking regulations will cause displacement, a judgement has to taken as to the significance of the effects of the displacement.

At the meeting, recognising that due process did not allow for a final decision to be made in that meeting, Cllr Andrew Davis requested that ward and divisional councillors meet with the officers to review possibilities, with a view to a decision being made expeditiously under the chairman’s delegated authority.  This was agreed by the local committee, and the chairman said he would use his delegated authority if necessary.

What should happen
The councillors and officers will meet to decide what proposal to put forward and how the informal consultation should be undertaken.  If a consensus can be reached a proposal will be advertised early next calendar year.

Continued Pressure
Surrey can seem remote – because it is. With the best will in the world, it is difficult for Surrey to fully grasp the nuances of parking stress over time and distance.  The highways engineers bring a wealth of knowledge on the effectiveness of each type of measure but we must be continually engaged with Surrey’s parking implementation process if we are to share the scarce resource of parking spaces effectively.  The focus team will work with to you.